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Ethical Research Involving Children

Producing and using video data in the early years: Ethical questions and practical consequences in research with young children.

Robson, S. (2011). Producing and using video data in the early years: Ethical questions and practical consequences in research with young children. Children & Society, 25(3), pp. 179-189.

Abstract: This article considers ethical questions and practical challenges arising from the production of video data with young children, and suggests that such considerations are reciprocal and that video data should be seen as constructed collaboratively by all participants. Video data can be a valuable means of eliciting children’s perspectives, but it raises particular issues of consent and confidentiality. Opportunities for young children to use video cameras are helpful in supporting informed consent and active participation, whilst the visual nature of video renders anonymity and confidentiality more difficult, and anonymisation of images may impact upon data quality. Video, like all research data, is influenced by the actions and biases of participants, and young children’s experiences as consumers of television will influence their reading of, and responses to, video data. An advantage of video is that it can provide participants with feedback about their participation. Challenges remain with regard to ownership. (Abstract published by arrangement with Wiley Subscription Services, Inc.).

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