Parental consent and the ethics of research with foster children: Beginning a cross-cultural dialogue.

Bogolub, E. B., & Thomas, N. (2005). Parental consent and the ethics of research with foster children: Beginning a cross-cultural dialogue. Qualitative Social Work, 4(3), pp. 271-292.


Abstract: Prior to writing this article, the two authors (Bogolub, US and Thomas, UK) conducted separate qualitative research studies with foster children. After briefly describing their individual studies, the two authors engage in a cross-cultural dialogue based on their differing perspectives on the importance of birth parent consent for foster children’s research participation. The authors’ differences appear largely, although not exclusively, related to contrasts between a US academic culture, which often stresses the fiduciary relationship between parents and developing children, and a UK academic culture, which places more emphasis on children’s competence and independence. Conclusions center on the importance of cross-cultural dialogue as a way to promote considered decisions about the overlapping methodological and ethical questions that inevitably arise when doing research with children, particularly those involved with the child welfare system. (The final, definitive version of this paper has been published in Qualitative Social Work, 4/3, 09/2005 by SAGE Publications, Ltd., All rights reserved. © Sage Publications Ltd.)

[button color=”primary” link=http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1473325005055592 target=”_blank”]Publisher’s Link[/button]