Ethical Research Involving Children

Conducting school-based focus groups: Lessons learned from the CATS project.

Horowitz, J. A., Vessey, J. A., Carlson, K. L., Bradley, J. F., Montoya, C., & McCullough, B. (2003). Conducting school-based focus groups: Lessons learned from the CATS project. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 18(5). pp. 321-331.

Participation of children in focus groups has received scant attention despite the effectiveness of group interviews in eliciting children’s views. Focus groups are a valuable approach for generating qualitative data from children; however, conducting school-based focus groups involves challenges specific to the school milieu and the ages and development of the participants. Lessons learned from conducting school-based focus groups during the Child-Adolescent Teasing Scale (CATS) project are applied to examination of key issues including entry to schools, informed consent and confidentiality, students’ cognitive development, safety within the group, and appropriate procedures. (This article was published in Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Vol 18(5), by Horowitz, J. A. et al. © Elsevier (2003) on behalf of Society of Pediatric Nurses and the Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society (PENS)).

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