Adolescent distress in traumatic stress research: Data from the National Survey of Adolescents-Replication.

Zajac, K., Ruggiero, K. J., Smith, D. W., Saunders, B. E., & Kilpatrick, D. G. (2011). Adolescent distress in traumatic stress research: Data from the National Survey of Adolescents-Replication. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 24(2), pp. 226-229.


Abstract: Small numbers of adults report distress in response to traumatic stress surveys. Less is known about adolescent research participants. We examined distress in response to a survey on traumatic stress using data from the National Survey of Adolescents-Replication, a nationally representative sample of 3,614 youth aged 12–17 years. Although 204 (5.7%) adolescents found some questions distressing, only 8 (0.2%) remained upset at the end of the interview, and 2 (<0.1%) wished to speak to a counselor. Adolescents reporting traumatic experiences or mental health problems were significantly more likely to report distress compared to those not endorsing such problems. Significantly more girls (7.5%) reported distress than boys (3.9%). Findings suggest that survey questions about trauma pose minimal risk to adolescents. (Abstract published by arrangement with Wiley Subscription Services, Inc.). [button color="primary" link=http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jts.20621 target="_blank"]Publisher's Link[/button] [button color="primary" link=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3113486/ target="_blank"]Open Access[/button]